Art + Decor

A is for Anhui, B is for Beijing

As a writer I’ve always subscribed to the adage, "write what you know." And I assume the same goes for other art forms as well. (Paper maché what you know!) So it’s not surprising that prolific illustrator and photographer Stephanie Wise began creating a spectacular series of modern adoption art in 2005 after setting off on her own adoption journey.

You Light Up My Life

While I would like to think a picture of my children makes a wonderfulpresent anytime of year, I suppose there’s a limit to how often you can hastily drop a snapshot into a frame and send it off to the in-laws.

The Walls They Are A-Changin’

It seems to me that what I’m looking for in kids’ room decor has transitioned almost as fast as my son has moved from the infant to the toddler to the kid section. Change is happening and it’s taking my soft, cuddly nursery fabric with it.

Finding Your Child Through Art

My five year old is on a mission to find herself–not through junior self-help seminars, but in every movie poster, magazine ad, or book cover she sees. Mimi will exclaim, "I’ll pretend to be that little girl in the picture, Momma. You can be the cow." (I don’t love being the cow.)

Arts and Science

As part of my ongoing crusade as a lover of science, my girls are exploring the natural world through trips to planetariums or even just finding ladybugs in the backyard. B

Kids Art With a Longer Shelf Life

As I’ve learned rather quickly–too quickly–the artwork you buy for your baby’s nursery might seem…well, babyish in a very short matter of time. Those sweet little Peter Rabbit prints that made you teary when your boy was just a babe in arms aren’t cutting it now that he’s three and answers to the name Mr. Destructo.

For the Birds

Artwork depicting the ABC’s or 1-2-3’s usually has a fairly short shelf-life (or wall-life, more accurately). Pastels and teddy bears are often deemed "babyish" around the same time that the diapers disappear.

Art by Actual Artists: What a Concept

I’ve always liked the idea of turning a favorite photo of my child into a piece of artwork. But a lot of those Warhol-eque services just look like a computer novice took a Photoshop 101 class, and went nutty with the filters. What ever happened to art made by actual artists?

Just Stick It

I have loved the clever, collagey, distinctive tee designs from Vancouver-based Dirty Laundry ever since we featured them last year. But the only problem with wearable art for kids – they most certainly can’t wear it forever.

Your Greatest Work of Art: Your Child

I’m always tempted to get one of those caricatures of my daughter at local art fairs. While I love the concept of my progeny immortalized at the skilled hand of an artist, something tells me that that’s not exactly what I’m going to end up with for my 20 bucks.

Yes, It Will Look Good Over the Sofa

I’m all for cultivating sophisticated aesthetic tastes at a young age. Kids may be kids, but their bedrooms and bathrooms don’t have to stuffed to the gills with licensed characters to be appealing to them. And when you’re spending big bucks on decor anyway, shouldn’t your nursery art actually be…well, art?

Girl Power

Considering how far the career possibilities for women have come even since we were kids, it blows my mind that it’s still hard to find art depicting girls much beyond princesses, ballerinas, and the ocassional generic animal lover. (Veterinarian? Or just crazy cat lady in the making?)

How Do You Spell Excellent Gift?

I love hunting for personalized art for children. But I admit an aversion to those painted plaques adorned with the ubiquitous puffy-pen scribbled names. I suppose I like my art to be actual art and not some craft project from the nice old lady down the block.

Music For Your Eyes

When we we reviewed the Little Bird CD from singer Elizabeth Mitchell last Fall, it was hard to decide which we loved more–her amazing tunes or the stunning album cover from talented New York City artist Ida Pearle. Now lucky parents (and their immensely lucky kids) can own both.